Parky's Place

If corporations are people my friend, why can’t people be corporations and get the same privileges and advantages that corporations do?

Del Mar racetrack promises an experience that is as “Cool as Ever.” What’s not cool is nine dead horses in the first nine days of this year’s 75th annual summer meet. Only four died last year.
Race horses die at the track all too frequently―between 200 and 400 a year in California. It is estimated that 24 horses die every week on U.S. racetracks.
But a cluster of deaths like this is unusual. Twelve died at Del Mar in 2011; five the year before, according to the California Horse Racing Board. Moving backward in time beginning with 2009, annual deaths totaled 9, 14, 12, 13, 23, 26, 17, 22 and finally 13 in 2001.
The usual suspects in horse racing deaths include breeding, medication, track surfaces and training, sometimes with nefarious overtones. A spate of mysterious sudden deaths in California last year―one trainer alone lost seven horses in 16 months―were never solved. But those horses were just keeling over with cardiac problems and internal bleeding issues.
So far, Del Mar authorities have focused on the track itself. They waxed the synthetic Polytrack and watered and aerated the turf track to slow things down. They also moved a rail to give the horses more room on turf.
That seemed to do it for Dr. Rick Arthur, the Racing Board medical director. “Everything they’ve done makes sense to me and hopefully it will take care of whatever issues there were,” he told the Los Angeles Times.        
One horse died racing opening day, July 17. A week later, Grass Stakes winner Dance With Fate was put down after his bridle came loose during a training exercise and he crashed into the outer chain-link fence. Another horse was found dead in the barn that day. Two died in races the next day and two more racing the day after that. One died during a workout last Sunday and another died of a heart attach that day. 
Horse racing officials have gone back and forth on track surfaces for years. In May 2006, after annual death counts hovered over 300, the Racing Board decided to get rid of dirt tracks in California and change to synthetics by the end of 2007. It issued an edict to racetrack owners throughout the state to comply or risk losing racing dates in 2008. California was the first state to mandate that its major thoroughbred tracks make the conversion.
The death counts held steady and critics of the synthetics said the state had move precipitously. In April 2009, the board began to hand out waivers and let tracks convert back to dirt.
Turf racing resumed at Del Mar on Wednesday. No horses died.
–Ken Broder

Del Mar racetrack promises an experience that is as “Cool as Ever.” What’s not cool is nine dead horses in the first nine days of this year’s 75th annual summer meet. Only four died last year.

Race horses die at the track all too frequently―between 200 and 400 a year in California. It is estimated that 24 horses die every week on U.S. racetracks.

But a cluster of deaths like this is unusual. Twelve died at Del Mar in 2011; five the year before, according to the California Horse Racing Board. Moving backward in time beginning with 2009, annual deaths totaled 9, 14, 12, 13, 23, 26, 17, 22 and finally 13 in 2001.

The usual suspects in horse racing deaths include breeding, medication, track surfaces and training, sometimes with nefarious overtones. A spate of mysterious sudden deaths in California last year―one trainer alone lost seven horses in 16 months―were never solved. But those horses were just keeling over with cardiac problems and internal bleeding issues.

So far, Del Mar authorities have focused on the track itself. They waxed the synthetic Polytrack and watered and aerated the turf track to slow things down. They also moved a rail to give the horses more room on turf.

That seemed to do it for Dr. Rick Arthur, the Racing Board medical director. “Everything they’ve done makes sense to me and hopefully it will take care of whatever issues there were,” he told the Los Angeles Times.        

One horse died racing opening day, July 17. A week later, Grass Stakes winner Dance With Fate was put down after his bridle came loose during a training exercise and he crashed into the outer chain-link fence. Another horse was found dead in the barn that day. Two died in races the next day and two more racing the day after that. One died during a workout last Sunday and another died of a heart attach that day. 

Horse racing officials have gone back and forth on track surfaces for years. In May 2006, after annual death counts hovered over 300, the Racing Board decided to get rid of dirt tracks in California and change to synthetics by the end of 2007. It issued an edict to racetrack owners throughout the state to comply or risk losing racing dates in 2008. California was the first state to mandate that its major thoroughbred tracks make the conversion.

The death counts held steady and critics of the synthetics said the state had move precipitously. In April 2009, the board began to hand out waivers and let tracks convert back to dirt.

Turf racing resumed at Del Mar on Wednesday. No horses died.

–Ken Broder

I used to watch HBO, but I had to decide whether to be able to pay for necessities or keep my movie channels when Time Warner Cable jacked up the rates big time last year. If my employer felt it in their heart to increase my compensation in relation to the importance of my job, skills, effort, and covering for people who left without being replaced at the same rates as cable companies and the channels they carry, I’d see a glimmer of hope of being in the middle class within my lifetime. 

It’s a good thing that segments of John Oliver’s show are videos that can be seen online, and this one tells you everything ass kissing lying political pundits that the mainstream corporate media lets on their programs are paid not to tell you.

What we can look forward to without Net Neutrality!

I hope that Tommy Ramone’s wishes are honored! He was the last original Ramone left standing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ramones

Untaxed dark money from MultiNational Corporations is helping them to extract all they can from America while enjoying privileges that the rest of us have to pay for. Are you ready for SHAFTA? (Southern Hemisphere and Asia Free Trade Agreement)

What they want is a Global Low Balling where they are allowed to colonize and metastasize. They are already enjoying considerable success in turning the USA into a Third World Nation, which only a few short decades ago undisputably had the most broad based prosperity on the planet.

America is now falling apart because great wealth is allowed to be taxed at ridiculously low rates and going offshore leaving the tax burden on the Middle Class, except they have also been systematically destroying the Middle Class by busting unions, and paying as little as they can get away with to the people who are making them rich despite increased productivity.

The CO2 in the atmosphere now exceeds 400 PPM the highest in the history of humans and is globally rising rapidly. Previous mass extinctions have followed excessive carbon emissions that have been associated with radical climate changes caused by their greenhouse effect which results in the releasing of locked up methane adding to even further heating.

Will human caused changes be as catastrophic as collisions from large asteroids or excessive volcanic activity have been to life on earth and will we be able to adapt enough to survive, or do we have the will and time to avert a disaster on a similar scale?   

vicemag:

This 16-Year-Old Made an App That Exposes Sellout Politicians
With US politics swimming in so much corporate money that it’s pretty much an oligarchy, it can be hard to keep track of which particular set of lobbyists is trying to milk more cash out of healthcare, fossil fuels and other very important issues from one week to the next.
But thanks to 16-year-old Nick Rubin, keeping track of just how much politicians have sold out has become a lot easier. He created Greenhouse, a new browser plugin which operates under the motto, “Some are red. Some are blue. All are green.” The plugin aims “to shine light on a social and industrial disease of today: the undue influence of money in our Congress.” It sounds like a bit of a lofty aim for an app, but it’s actually pretty simple and effective—it provides a break down of a politician’s campaign contributions when that politician’s name comes up in an article. It is currently available for Chrome, Firefox and Safari and is completely free. As you can imagine, reading about how your Member of Congress voted in a recent health bill becomes all the more enlightening if you know how much money the health industry showered him in at the last election.
I spoke to Nick Rubin about the plugin, politics and what he calls the “money stories” behind what you read in the news.

VICE: Hi Nick. So how did you come up with the idea for Greenhouse?Nick Rubin: Back in seventh grade, I gave a presentation on corporate personhood and ever since then I’ve been really interested in that issue. I think the one problem is that the sources of income for members of congress haven’t been simple and easily accessible when people have needed it. More recently, I’ve been teaching myself how to code and I thought that something like Greenhouse that puts the data at people’s fingertips would be a perfect solution. It really is the intersection of these two passions of mine—coding and politics. I made it after school and on weekends on my computer.
Why the name?Well, green is the color of money in the US, and house refers to the two houses of Congress [the Senate and House of Representatives]. The name also implies transparency; greenhouses are see through and they are built to help things thrive.
Where did you get the information on the politician’s donations?It uses the data from the last full election cycle which was 2012. This is simply because it’s just the most complete set of data that we have. But, the browser does provide access to the most up to date 2014 information by just clicking the name of the politician on the top of the window or theOpenSecrets.org link in the popup. So the 2014 data is just one click away.
I’m intending to update the data as a whole later in the election cycle as the 2014 contributions are more complete. These are updates I’m currently working on, as well as thinking of other ways I can expand the tool.
Continue

vicemag:

This 16-Year-Old Made an App That Exposes Sellout Politicians

With US politics swimming in so much corporate money that it’s pretty much an oligarchy, it can be hard to keep track of which particular set of lobbyists is trying to milk more cash out of healthcare, fossil fuels and other very important issues from one week to the next.

But thanks to 16-year-old Nick Rubin, keeping track of just how much politicians have sold out has become a lot easier. He created Greenhouse, a new browser plugin which operates under the motto, “Some are red. Some are blue. All are green.” The plugin aims “to shine light on a social and industrial disease of today: the undue influence of money in our Congress.” It sounds like a bit of a lofty aim for an app, but it’s actually pretty simple and effective—it provides a break down of a politician’s campaign contributions when that politician’s name comes up in an article. It is currently available for Chrome, Firefox and Safari and is completely free. As you can imagine, reading about how your Member of Congress voted in a recent health bill becomes all the more enlightening if you know how much money the health industry showered him in at the last election.

I spoke to Nick Rubin about the plugin, politics and what he calls the “money stories” behind what you read in the news.

VICE: Hi Nick. So how did you come up with the idea for Greenhouse?
Nick Rubin: Back in seventh grade, I gave a presentation on corporate personhood and ever since then I’ve been really interested in that issue. I think the one problem is that the sources of income for members of congress haven’t been simple and easily accessible when people have needed it. More recently, I’ve been teaching myself how to code and I thought that something like Greenhouse that puts the data at people’s fingertips would be a perfect solution. It really is the intersection of these two passions of mine—coding and politics. I made it after school and on weekends on my computer.

Why the name?
Well, green is the color of money in the US, and house refers to the two houses of Congress [the Senate and House of Representatives]. The name also implies transparency; greenhouses are see through and they are built to help things thrive.

Where did you get the information on the politician’s donations?
It uses the data from the last full election cycle which was 2012. This is simply because it’s just the most complete set of data that we have. But, the browser does provide access to the most up to date 2014 information by just clicking the name of the politician on the top of the window or theOpenSecrets.org link in the popup. So the 2014 data is just one click away.

I’m intending to update the data as a whole later in the election cycle as the 2014 contributions are more complete. These are updates I’m currently working on, as well as thinking of other ways I can expand the tool.

Continue

#Yahoo

#Yahoo

I really can’t add anything at all to this because it’s all here!

Bernie Sanders on why gas prices go up which has nothing to do with supply and demand, and his legislation to solve the problem.

ppaction:

Extraordinary.

ppaction:

Extraordinary.

I’m very proud to be a Californian right now!!!

Parky’s Place turned 3 today!

Parky’s Place turned 3 today!